Posts Tagged ‘first in series’

Front Lines (Soldier Girl #1) – Michael Grant

Posted in American Fiction, WWII, YA Fiction on April 9th, 2016 by admin – Be the first to comment

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Michael Grant has written over 150 books, most of them co-authored with his wife Katherine Applegate but Front Lines is my first experience of his writing – I now can’t wait to investigate his other novels, I might be gone some time! His latest novel is set in the mid 1940s and it is an alternate history of America’s involvement in World War 2, with females being sent to the front lines for the first time.

An anonymous narrator relates the stories of three American recruits who hail from very different backgrounds – Rio Richlin, a farmer’s daughter from California, Frangie Marr from Tulsa who faces a double dose of discrimination as a result of her gender and skin colour and Rainy Schulterman, intellectual Jewish New Yorker. I was pleased that there wasn’t too much romance and more of a focus on the realities of life in the army and how these teenagers, both male and female, struggle to adjust to life at the front. It was also refreshing to hear the stories of soldiers involved in North African operations, a location often overlooked in YA novels about World War II.

Michael Grant doesn’t hold back in his presentation of the brutality of warfare so those of a nervous disposition might be traumatised by the graphic detail. I can’t wait for the next in the series to see how army life continues to mould the characters’ personalities, for better and for worse.

An intelligent, fast paced opening to an exciting new series with extremely engaging characters. Highly recommended for older teens and even young at heart adults!

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Wars of the Roses – Stormbird by Conn Iggulden

Posted in Historical Fiction on July 31st, 2013 by admin – 8 Comments

Wars of the Roses: Stormbird

Published
10/10/2013

Publisher
Michael Joseph Ltd

 Source
www.realreaders.com

My Rating
3 stars

 

This is my first venture into Iggulden territory. I’ve avoided his writing before as I’ve tended to associate him with “books for boys” – an association which was reaffirmed with the publication of The Dangerous Book for Boys which he co-wrote with his brother Hal. However, Stormbird attracted me as I find the War of the Roses a particularly intriguing historical period peopled with really engaging characters.

 

Having now read the novel, I can confirm it is a book for boys, filled with derring-do, lots of blood and gore and a love of detail, especially when it comes to the physical make up of an archer and his weaponry. Now, there’s nothing wrong with attention to detail but I, personally, prefer my historical fiction to have more focus on the inner thoughts and motivation of characters with a particular emphasis on the female point of view plus a tad less poetic licence when it comes to the facts….I think we’ll just have to agree to differ!

 

I loved the passages featuring Margaret d’Anjou as she grew in confidence from a young 14 year old being gifted to the English king in order to gain a truce to a strong-willed, brave woman struggling to hold on to her husband’s throne while he was non compos mentis. I also enjoyed the portrayal of the brave, devoted Lord Suffolk who gave his heart and soul for his country. Less inspiring, for me, were the skirmishes between the English and French and the long trek of Jack Cade and his army of Kentish men as they laid siege to London.

 

Stormbird is the first of a series of books about The War of the Roses and I am sure it will be as successful as Iggulden’s previous novels. It will appeal to those who enjoy action-packed, high-octane novels with lots of battles and information on strategy. As for me, being a bit of a girly, I’ll stick with Philippa and Alison!

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